Microsoft kills Minecraft

Apparently Microsoft has bought Mojang, the game studio that brought us Minecraft.  I find it hard to think of a worse cultural match than this one – Microsoft has spent the last twenty years, for example, trying to move its customers off a once off license payment and into a subscription model.  It reminds me of the last Microsoft game I ever played (Mechwarrior Vengeance – no, seriously).  Microsoft bought out the Mechwarrior franchise and (IMO) killed the magic.  My guess is that Minecraft’s days (or at least Minecraft’s days of magic) are numbered.

Thoughts on Online Copyright Infringement Discussion Paper

AGs is seeking public submissions on Online Copyright Infringement.

Some thoughts are:

The cover letter to the inquiry cites a PWC report prepared for the Australian Copyright Council.  The letter fails to note that gains are offset by the role of intellectual property in transfer pricing by multinationals.  There is strong evidence to suggest that intellectual property regimes have the effect of substantially reducing Australian taxation revenue through the use of transfer pricing mechanisms.

Page 3 of the discussion paper states that  the High Court in Roadshow said “that there were no reasonable steps that could have been taken by iiNet to reduce its subscribers’ infringements.”  The discussion paper goes on to enquire about what reasonable steps a network operator could take to reduce subscribers’ infringements. The whole of the debate about copyright infringement on the internet is infected by this sort of double speak.

The discussion paper does not specifically ask about a three strikes regime.  However, it invites discussion of a three strikes regime by raising it in the cover matter then inviting proposals as to what might be a “reasonable step.  Where noted my responses on a particular question relate to a three strikes regime.

Question 1:

Compelling an innocent person to assist a third party is to deprive that person of their liberty.  The only reasonable steps that come to mind are for network operators to respond to subpoenas validly issued to them – at least that is determined on a case by case basis under the supervision of a court.

Question 2:

Innocent third parties should not be required to assist in the enforcement of someone else’s rights. Any assistance that an innocent third party is required to give should be at the rights holder’s cost.  To do otherwise is to effectively require (in the case of a network) all customers to subsidise the private rights of the “rights’ holders'” enforcement. This is an inefficient an inequitable equivalent to a taxation scheme for public services.  The Government may as well compulsorily acquire the rights in question and equitably spread the cost through a levy.

Question 3:

No.  The existing section 36/101 was specifically inserted to provide exactly the clarity proposed here.  Rights holders were satisfied at the time.

Question 4:

Presumably reasonable is an objective test.

Question 5:

This response assumes the proposed implementation of a “three strikes” regime.

There is a Federal Magistrates court which is able to hear copyright infringement cases.  Defendants should have the right to have the case against them heard in a judicial forum. Under a three strikes regime an individual is required to justify their actions based on an accusation of infringement.  In the absence of a justification they suffer a sanction.  Our legal system should not be driven by mere accusations.  Defendants also have the right to know that the case against them is particular to them and not a cookie cutter accusation.

Question 6:

The court should have regard to what aims a block is intended to achieve, whether a block will be effective in achieving those aims and what impact a block will have on innocent third parties which may be affected by it.  For example, when Megaupload was taken down many innocent people lost their data with no warning.  This is more likely to be the case in the future as computing resources are increasingly shared in load balanced cloud storage implementations. These third parties are not represented in court and have no opportunity to put their case before a block is implemented.

A practice should be established whereby the court requires an undertaking from any person seeking a block to indemnify any innocent third party affected by the block against any damage suffered by them.  Alternatively, the Government could establish a victims compensation scheme that can run alongside such a block.  These third parties will be collateral damage from such a scheme.  Indeed, if the test for a site is only a “dominant purpose” test then collateral damage necessarily a consequence of the block.   An indemnity will serve the purpose of guiding incentives to reduce damage to innocent third parties.

Question 7

If the Government implements proposals which extend the applicability of auhtorisation infringements to smaller and smaller entities (eg a cafe providing wifi) then the safe harbour provisions need to be sufficiently simple and certain as to allow those entities to rely on them. At the moment they are compex and convoluted. If a cafe is forced to pay hundreds or thousands of dollars for legal advice about their wifi service, they will simply not provide it.

Question 8

Before the impact of measures can be measured [sic] a baseline first needs to be established for the purpose the Copyright Act is intended to serve.   In particular, the purpose of the Copyright Act is not to reduce infringement.  Rather, its titular purpose is to promote the creation of works and other subject matter.  This receives no mention in the discussion paper.  Historically, the Copyright Act has been promoted as necessary to maintain distribution networks (pre 1980s), as a means of providing creators with an income (last 2 centuries, but repeatedly contradicted empirically – most recently in the Don’t Give Up Your Day Job report),  as a natural right of authors (00s – contrary to judicial pronouncements on the issue) and now, apparently, as a means of stimulating the economy.  An Act which has so mutable a purpose ought to be considered with a jaundiced eye.

The reference to the PWC document suggests that the Hargreaves report would be a good starting point for further policy making.

Question 9

The retail price of downloadable copies of copyright works in Australia (exclusive of GST) should not exceed the price in their country of origin by more than 5% when sold directly.  The 5% figure is intended to allow for some additional costs of selling into Australia.

Implement the Productivity Commission’s recommendations on parallel importation.

Question 10, 11

The next two paragraphs of the response to this question deals primarily with a possible three strikes regime although the final observations are of a general character.

“Three strikes” regulation will effectively shift the burden of enforcement further away from rights holders to people who are the least equipped to implement it.  What will parents who receive warning letters do?  Will they implement a sophisticated filtering system on their home router?  Will they send their children off to a reeducation camp run by the rights’ holders? More likely they will blanket ban the internet access.  How will cafes manage their risk? More likely they will not provide wifi access.  This has already been the death knell of community wifi networks in the US.  The collateral damage from these proposals is difficult to quantify but there is every reason to believe it will be widespread.  This damage is routinely ignored in policy making.

Will rights’ holders use such a system against everyone? That is unlikely.  Rather, it will be used against some individuals unlucky enough to be first on the list. Those individuals will be used as examples for others.  This will be a law which will be enforced in an arbitrary and discriminatory fashion.  As such it will undermine respect for the law more generally.

The comments on the proposals above assume that they are acted on bona fide.  Once network operators are conditioned to a Pavlovian response to requests the system will be abused – the Get Up! organisation already believes it has been the subject of misuse: https://www.getup.org.au/campaigns/great-barrier-reef–3/adani-video/someone-wants-to-silence-us-dont-let-them

Evasion technologies have previously been a niche interest.  The size of the market limited their growth.  These provisions will sheet home to all citizens the need to implement evasion technologies, thereby greatly increasing the market and therefore the economic incentive for their evolution.  The long run effect of implementing proposals which effect this form of general surveillance of the population is to weaken national security.

By insulating rights holders from the costs of enforcement the proposals disconnect rights holders from the very externalities that enforcement creates.  If there were ever a recipe for poor policy, such a disconnection would be a key element of it.

 

 

Android UI: sigh

In July I got an update to Android on my phone (an otherwise wonderful Galaxy Note 3).  It’s not awful, but the choices it has made are very annoying. In particular:

* email – I cannot now just have my email update when I click the refresh icon because I need to have auto sync data enabled.  So to have manual syncing of data I need to go into settings ->connections->data usage, press the menu button, select “auto sync data”, then go to my email app and click its refresh icon (then, technically, go back again to turn off auto sync again)

* wifi – everything is now dependent upon whether or not I’m connected to wifi, because, if I’m connected to wifi everything must be ok right? Well, you genii, who put wifi hotspot functionality into my phone? Now, I can’t actually use my wifi hotspot without worrying whether my tablet is going to auto-download a ton of stuff and blow my cap when I least expect it.  Thanks, thanks a lot.

* internet – I used to be able to have a number of windows open, and scroll through the open ones.  Now only my last _four_ are visible.  What the hay?  Sort of undermines the point of being able to have a number of windows open much? (Internet in general has a heap of odd design choices – forcing new tabs to open in the foreground being a pet hate)

* background data – if I want to have background data restriction on it puts a permanent notification in the notification bar.  Get that junk out of there. I’m a responsible adult for heaven’s sake.

* wifi direct (not actually from the update): why can’t I use wifi to transfer files directly between my phone and tablet without without going via a third router?  My phone can act as a wifi hotspot, why do I have to connect both devices to a third device?

These mind boggling UI choices make me wonder what’s going on with Android and whether it’s turned a corner – the wrong corner.

 

 

 

UK Govt Adopts PDF, ODF

The Cabinet Office has announced the adoption of its open standards:

“The selected standards, which are compatible with commonly used document applications, are:

PDF/A or HTML for viewing government documents

Open Document Format (ODF) for sharing or collaborating on government documents

The move supports the government’s policy to create a level playing field for suppliers of all sizes, with its digital by default agenda on track to make cumulative savings of £1.2 billion in this Parliament for citizens, businesses and taxpayers.”

Imagine a world in which there is the possibility of competition for office suites.  One day Australia might join that world too.

Why takedown procedures are such abysmal policy

Getup alleges that someone has copied one of Getup’s videos, then issuing a takedown over the same video in respect of Getup.  With copyright enforcement rhetoric running hysterical for years now it comes as no surprise that the provider of the video site would remove Getup’s video.  Takedown procedures are specifically designed to be swift and effective against allegations, regardless of the justice of the matter.  Given such a lopsided approach to rights, it is surprising that it has taken until now for people to start abusing the system.  It will get worse in the future.

ACIP Report on Innovation Patents Released

They say there is no evidence one way or the other about the usefulness of the innovation patent system.  Seem a little annoyed that so many people said to remove software patents.

Details here.

Pygame Subset For Android FTW!

Pygame Subset For Android FTW!

I was looking to port some things I’ve written over to run on Android – in particular, I decided to migrate this yesterday. I have done it as of today, albeit as a working prototype, using the Pygame Subset for Android. The only thing I had to modify was to rename the main script as main.py and rewrite a little of the main game loop. Total time from learning that PGS4A existed (about 11am this morning) to having a working prototype on my Android Tablet is 7 hours. That includes about 6 hours of being away from my desk doing other things and maybe 30 minutes of downloading, installing PGS4A and its dependencies. Actual coding changes took maybe 5 minutes for roughly 1200 lines of code (excluding blank lines, comments etc). That said, now I have to hook up the multitouch interface and it has some unexplained (and critical) pauses when played.

PGS4A is a really quick and cheap way of getting an existing pygame based application onto Android.


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